With headquarters in Houston, Texas, Just Energy provides electricity and natural gas to more than 1.8 million customers in regions of Texas and about a dozen other states, as well as several Canadian provinces and parts of the United Kingdom. By creating energy-efficiency programs and encouraging the growth of green energy in America, Just Energy Texas gives its customers the opportunity to receive competitive supply rates and reduce their environmental impact.
To do so, we used five of the state’s largest electricity companies to explore six things you'll have to evaluate when you're comparing plans and providers: We’ll walk you through customer satisfaction scores, running the numbers on rates, and calculating the impact of different fees, discounts, and contract types. We'll weigh in on extra perks, like points, and green energy too.
You should also check your tenancy agreement – but even if your contract bans switching, Ofgem's guidance on this states that if you pay the energy bill, you're still entitled to change supplier any time. You can still compare on Cheap Energy Club if you don't have the former occupants' bills, just hit the "don't know" button when you enter your usage.

Among their other predictions for the year ahead, they suggest that investment in clean energy will again struggle to grow. In part, this is because there is a surplus of solar equipment thanks to a slowdown in the Chinese, Japanese and Brazilian markets and a continuing fall in the price of wind power. Offshore wind in Europe, which had a stellar 2016, will struggle to match last year’s figures as developers concentrate on building the projects they financed last year. Finally, a strong dollar and the end of the low-interest rate era are likely to depress investment, too.


Twenty-nine states have deregulated electricity, natural gas or both. That allows you to shop for the supply portion of your bill from alternative providers who may offer rates lower than the default supplier – usually a utility. Delivery services and billing will remain the responsibility of the local utility as they own the power lines and wires that keep the lights on.
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