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Fixed-rate, long-term (contract) plans provide stability in electricity rates. If market energy costs suddenly trend upward where you live, you can rest assured that you won’t have to pay more out of pocket. However, if you want to switch to a different, lower-cost plan before the end of the contract term, you’ll likely have to pay a cancellation or early termination fee.
It is not a well-known fact that consumers can take advantage of energy deregulation and choose an alternative energy supplier, known as an Energy Service Company (ESCO). In addition to offering lower electricity and gas rates, an ESCO can provide other energy options, not otherwise available by your local traditional utility company, such as renewable green energy (solar, wind or hydropower) and fixed-rate plans. Energy deregulation allows residents and businesses to shop around for energy, compare electricity and gas rates, find the cheapest providers and easily switch electricity and gas suppliers online. Compare ESCOs and their rates, choose the cheapest electricity or gas provider, and you can reduce your energy expense, such as Con Edison electric or gas bill, if you live in New York City, or United Illuminating or Eversource bill if you live in Connecticut or Public Service Electric and Gas, Jersey Central Power and Light, Atlantic City Electric, Rockland Electric Company bill if you live in New Jersey. PowerSetter specializes in educating New York, New Jersey and Connecticut residents about comparing electricity and gas providers, and making switching energy suppliers an easy and painless process. In addition to offering tools to compare energy rates, PowerSetter only selects plans with no hidden monthly and/or enrollment fees and works with the most reliable and trusted alternative electric and gas companies.

In 2016, for example, they correctly called the recovery in oil prices but failed to foresee that clean energy investment would fall. Funds flowing into the sector were 18% lower than the previous year at $287.5bn, although they estimate that about half of the drop was due to lower costs rather than a decline in activity. A slowdown in the Chinese market was the other major factor.
Last year the duo said that sales would break the 500,000 milestone but significantly underestimated the market’s  growth, so “at the start of 2017, Angus and I are going to throw prudence to the winds, run our hands through our grey sea-captain hair, and bet it breaks the million mark”, helped by higher oil prices, a flood of new, improved models on the market, ongoing falls in battery prices and improved charging infrastructure. The aforementioned need to improve air quality and the continued fallout from the Dieselgate scandal will play a part, too.
Last year the duo said that sales would break the 500,000 milestone but significantly underestimated the market’s  growth, so “at the start of 2017, Angus and I are going to throw prudence to the winds, run our hands through our grey sea-captain hair, and bet it breaks the million mark”, helped by higher oil prices, a flood of new, improved models on the market, ongoing falls in battery prices and improved charging infrastructure. The aforementioned need to improve air quality and the continued fallout from the Dieselgate scandal will play a part, too.
Even though customers in deregulated cities routinely pay more for electricity, there is a bright spot. The gap between the average price paid for electricity between deregulated cities like Houston and regulated cities like San Antonio have dwindled to the narrowest point ever to 8.8 percent. Back in 2006, customers in deregulated cities were paying nearly 47 percent more for electricity than their counterparts in regulated cities.
The local electric company is the utility – that’s the company who owns the infrastructure, including the poles and power lines that deliver electricity to your home. They are who you call if your power goes out or there's an emergency. But in almost every city in Texas, you must choose another company to supply that energy, called a Retail Electric Provider (REP). These REPs, like Spark Energy, allow you to choose electricity plans that offer competitive prices and plans to meet your needs.
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